look#


look#
look vb
1 *see, watch
Analogous words: *gaze, gape, stare, glare, peer: *scrutinize, scan, inspect, examine
2 *seem, appear
Analogous words: indicate, betoken, bespeak: *show, manifest, evidence, evince, demonstrate
3 *expect, hope, await
Analogous words: *foresee, foreknow, anticipate, divine
look n 1 Look, sight, view, glance, glimpse, peep, peek are comparable when meaning both the act of seeing something and the thing that is seen.
Look implies the directing of one's eyes to a thing or the use of one's power of vision
{

let me have a look at the patient

}
{

one dying look he upward cast— Scott

}
{

darted a quick look at meKenneth Roberts

}
When applied to the thing seen (see also APPEARANCE), the impression produced tends to be stressed
{

judging by the look of his rash, he has scarlet fever

}
{

the look of his face as he spoke was by no means pleasant— Trollope

}
Sight, on the other hand, so strongly implies reference to the object that is seen that it suggests reception of an image by the visual powers or presentation to the sense of sight rather than a conscious use of that sense. When the term denotes the act or the power of seeing, one takes a look at something which catches his sight; one has far sight who sees things at a great distance
{

the litter is set down stage in full sight of the audience— Millay

}
{

I was out of sight of the rest of them— L. A. Viereck

}
When the term denotes the thing that is seen, qualifying words or phrases are usually necessary to suggest its character, appearance, or the effect it produces
{

there is no sight in the world equal to it

}
{

a disagreeable sight

}
{

the blossoming of a cherry orchard ... is a sight eagerly awaited— Amer. Guide Series: Mich.

}
{

the earth, and every common sightWordsworth

}
View, especially when it denotes the act of seeing, implies chiefly the exercise of the mental rather than the physical vision or an attempt to comprehend something beyond the range of the physical vision
{

bring the buried ages back to viewGray

}
{

the scientific view of the world is not indifferent to quality or value. It seeks to find law, harmony, uniformity in nature— Inge

}
{

Unitarianism with its more cheerful view of human nature— Sperry

}
Often, when seeing through the eyes is suggested, view takes the place of sight in either sense, with, however, a stronger implication of a directed or fixed gaze
{

thy dales, and hills, are fading from my viewKeats

}
{

a house that affords a view of the ocean

}
{

trees that intercept the view

}
Glance may denote something which is seen as a sudden flash or gleam, or the presence or movement of which is recognized by a swift sudden flash
{

with winged expedition swift as the lightning glanceMilton

}
{

each sword's bright glance, seemed summons from their fate— Stirling

}
It is in this sense that "a glance from the eye" is often to be interpreted, especially in older writings
{

dart not scornful glances from those eyes, to wound thy lord— Shak.

}
but the transition in sense from the flash that is seen to the quick look that is given is not clearly marked
{

lift our heads to heaven, and never more abase our sight so low as to vouchsafe one glance unto the ground— Shak.

}
{

a glance satisfied him of the hopelessness of the struggle— J. R. Green

}
Glimpse also may apply to something seen as a flash or a gleam
{

no dear glimpse of the sun's lovely face, strikes through the solid darkness of the place— Cowley

}
{

a glimpse of the moon showed the dark and huge tower— Scott

}
but more commonly implies a brief view of a thing or, even more often, as much of it as may be taken in at a glance
{

I did indeed for a brief evening obtain a glimpse of the richness and still beauty of an English harvest— Jefferies

}
{

you remember I had a glimpse of him once— Conrad

}
{

it was in one of these laboratories that I had my first and only glimpse of the fabulous plutonium— Douglas Brown

}
Peep and peek are not clearly distinguishable in meaning, but the former is generally regarded as more dignified or less childish. When they denote the act of looking, both terms imply an attempt to see what is hidden or concealed, or what can be only furtively watched (as through a hole or a crevice or through half-shut eyes)
{

take a peek through a keyhole

}
When, however, they denote something which is seen by peeping or peeking, peep seems to be the favored word
{

you've only seen a peep through the curtain— Stowe

}
{

nOne of these men has so far written a popular book of peeps into the fairyland of reality— T. S. Eliot

}
Analogous words: gazing or gaze, staring or stare (see GAZE): scrutiny, inspection, examination (see under SCRUTINIZE)
2 *appearance, aspect, semblance
Analogous words: *bearing, demeanor, mien: *posture, attitude, pose: *face, countenance, visage, physiognomy

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • look — look …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • look — /look/, v.i. 1. to turn one s eyes toward something or in some direction in order to see: He looked toward the western horizon and saw the returning planes. 2. to glance or gaze in a manner specified: to look questioningly at a person. 3. to use… …   Universalium

  • Look — (l[oo^]k), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Looked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Looking}.] [OE. loken, AS. l[=o]cian; akin to G. lugen, OHG. luog[=e]n.] 1. To direct the eyes for the purpose of seeing something; to direct the eyes toward an object; to observe with the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • look — ► VERB 1) direct one s gaze in a specified direction. 2) have an outlook in a specified direction. 3) have the appearance or give the impression of being. ► NOUN 1) an act of looking. 2) an expression of a feeling or thought by looking at someone …   English terms dictionary

  • look — [look] vi. [ME loken < OE locian, akin to OS lōkōn, OHG luogēn (Ger dial. lugen), to spy after, look for] 1. to make use of the sense of sight; see 2. a) to direct one s eyes in order to see b) to direct one s attention mentally upon something …   English World dictionary

  • Look — ist ein Begriff/Wort aus der englischen Sprache, das sowohl als Verb als auch Hauptwort vielfältige Bedeutung haben kann: als Anglizismus, wird Look vor allem als Synonym im Sinne von Aussehen bzw. Stil verwendet, z. B.: Afro Look, wilde… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • look — [ luk ] n. m. • 1977; mot angl. « aspect, allure » ♦ Anglic. Aspect physique (style vestimentaire, coiffure...) volontairement étudié, caractéristique d une mode. Il a un drôle de look. ⇒ allure, genre. Un look d enfer. Changer de look. ♢ Image… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Look-in — was a long running children s magazine centered around ITV s television programmes in the UK, and subtitled The Junior TV Times . It ran from January 9, 1971 to 12 March 1994 [ [http://www.geocities.com/juniortvtimes2006/94No10/1994 no10 pg01… …   Wikipedia

  • look — 1. non standard uses. There are various idiomatic uses of look that are confined to particular parts of the English speaking world and are not part of standard English: for example look you as a way of attracting attention, found in Shakespeare • …   Modern English usage

  • LOOK — LOOK, established in Nevers, France in 1951, was originally a ski equipment manufacturer. The company produced bindings both under its own name and under other brands such as Rossignol and Dynastar. The partnership with Rossignol (which later… …   Wikipedia

  • Look — [lʊk], der; s, s: (besonders in Bezug auf Mode) bestimmter Stil: einen sportlichen Look bevorzugen; einen neuen Look kreieren. Syn.: ↑ Aussehen, ↑ Note, ↑ Optik. Zus.: Astronautenlook, Gammellook, Safarilook, Schlabberlook, Trachtenlook. * * *… …   Universal-Lexikon


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